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Home School: Real Socialization

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"But What About Socialization?"
Homeschool Confession: I don't want my boys to be "Socialized"
Crystal Brothers
Socialization is all about conforming--to societal demands, attitudes, styles, values, beliefs, and ways of dressing, acting, and thinking. Socialization’s very aim is to break us from any and all individuality, so that we can better integrate into the system–even if it’s a broken system. But by not conforming to this dynamic--not teaching them to conform--you can teach them to be in the world in a more natural way.
Homeschool Socialization: An Imaginary Problem
Michelle Cannon
"What about socialization?" It is the most persistent of all questions posed to homeschool parents? But is it a valid issue?
Homeschooled Kids: But What About Socialization?
Laura Osborne
What about socialization? This is one of the most common questions confronting homeschooling. Socialization is the process whereby the young of a culture learn the rules, mores, traditions, and acceptable interactions of their particular society. Regardless of being at home or at school, a child will be socialized. The question then seems to be: what is the best agent of socialization? Realizing that when a child graduates, he is never again cloistered in an environment with same-age peers makes one question the authenticity of the school as a superior socializing agent. But detractors ask, does the homeschool student do as well in measures of interpersonal and communication skills as his traditionally schooled peers? Let's look at the research.
Homeschooling Socialization for the Shy Ones
Sometimes, socializing is hard work, especially for those of us who have a shy kid—and if statistics are accurate, nearly half of Americans call themselves “shy.” For those of us homeschooling shy kids, there is a temptation to just let it go. It would be so much easier to just stay at home, curled up on the couch, than to watch our shy kid suffer or to feel compelled to make apologies for our shy kid. For those of us homeschooling shy kids, there is a temptation to just let it go. It would be so much easier to just stay at home, curled up on the couch, than to watch our shy kid suffer or to feel compelled to make apologies for our shy kid.
Homeschooling Statistics: Socialization and Sociability
Sara Mcgrath
According to Patrick Basham, author of the Fraser Institute's 2007 examination of homeschooling's growth from extreme to mainstream, "...the academic and socialization outcomes for the average home schooled child are superior to those experienced by the average public school student." When the socialization of homeschoolers is questioned, it's important to clearly define what the critic is asking. For example, how is socialization, an institutional training process, different from extracurricular social interactions, socializing, and sociability?
Home-Schooling: Socialization not a problem
Washington Times
One of the most persistent criticisms of home-schooling is the accusation that home-schoolers will not be able to fully participate in society because they lack “socialization.” It’s a challenge that reaches right to the heart of home-schooling, because if a child isn’t properly socialized, how will that child be able to contribute to society? Home-school families across the nation knew criticisms about adequate socialization were ill-founded — they had the evidence right in their own homes. In part to address this question from a research perspective, the Home School Legal Defense Association commissioned a study in 2003 titled “Homeschooling Grows Up,” conducted by Mr. Ray, to discover how home-schoolers were faring as adults. The news was good for home-schooling. In all areas of life, from gaining employment, to being satisfied with their home-schooling, to participating in community activities, to voting, home-schoolers were more active and involved than their public school counterparts.
No Thank You, We Don't Believe in Socialization
Lisa Russell
Lisa Russell looks at why learning socialization in school is an absurd concept that does not necessarily translate well to the real world.
Oh NO! I forgot about Socialization!
When many people ask about homeschooling, usually one of the FIRST comments and/or questions they ask involves the big “s” word – Socialization. How do they get socialized if they don’t go to school? Don’t you worry that he won’t be socialized? The list goes on… Socialization is truly a myth that plagues the homeschool community.
Social Development and the Homeschooled Child
Dr. Scott Turansky
Many people cannot understand how a homeschooled child can have adequate social interaction with others. They imagine that these children must have little contact with others, day after day. But this is really a lack of understanding about what socialization really is and how it works in a homeschool environment. In this article, Dr. Scott Turansky challenges the assumptions about socialization and explains what really takes place in the typical homeschool.
Socialization is a Bunch of Malarkey
Most folks who ask about socialization mean well. They are not plotting against us, but they are uninformed. But modern socialization in schools is not natural or desired.
Socialization Myth and Homeschooling
Tamra Orr
Ask any homeschooler you meet—whether a novice or a veteran—what is the number one objection people have to homeschooling? It’s always socialization. Let’s dispense with this issue once and for all with these points that homeschoolers make about socialization.
Socialization: A Great Reason Not to Go to School
Karl M. Bunday
This "Learn in Freedom" article provides research supporting the positive socialization homeschooled children receive. Discusses research supporting the conclusion that homeschooled children have higher levels of self-esteem and communication skills, and fewer behavioral problems, than other children.
Socialization: Homeschoolers Are in the Real World
Chris Klicka
Academically homeschoolers have generally excelled, but some critics have continued to challenge them on an apparent “lack of socialization” or “isolation from the world.” Often there is a charge that homeschoolers are not learning how to live in the “real world.” However, a closer look at public school training shows that it is actually public school children who are not living in the real world.
Socialization: Tackling Homeschooling’s “S” Word
Bridget Bentz Sizer
The mainstream perception of homeschool students is that they are an antisocial bunch, toiling away lonely hours at a kitchen table with only their parents for friends. But homeschoolers themselves will tell you that socialization—the “S-word,” as some call it—is really a nonissue.
Socialization? Not in My Homeschool!
LaToya Edwards
There are different views of socialization. Ideas for what to do instead of typical socialization.
Socializing the Homeschooled Child
This youtube video from iHomeschool Hangout discusses the issue of socialization and homeschooling. Guests are Sade Tagbo, Sam Kelley, Jimmie Lanley, and Colleen Kessler. The hostess is Dianna Kennedy.
Solving the Socialization Dilemma
All children need socialization, including homeschoolers. Interestingly, the definition of the word “socialize” is “to make social; especially, to fit or train for a social environment”. The difference for homeschooling families is in how we choose to provide training that for them.
The How To’s of Homeschool Socialization
Heidi Ciravola
Is the only place to learn from others found within the four walls of a school? If we follow the logic that socialization only comes from school, are we then to assume socialization does not occur within the family unit, at church, or on any give sports team? How about during neighborhood play or at the local playground? And if we assume socialization is a process occurring throughout our lives then what happens when we are no longer within the four walls of elementary, middle or high school? You socialize a homeschool child, or anyone else for that matter by having them live their lives, be in their environment and around the people you would normally be around during the course of a day.
The Myth of Socialization
Diane S. Spears, Ed.D.
If socializing is a problem for homeschool families, it is rare. The homeschool socialization myth is a misconception perpetrated by people who know little or nothing of the benefits or facts. Some parents believed they would be breaking the law by not sending their children to public school. Unfortunately, there are movements in some states to pass such laws. But as of yet, it is still lawful to homeschool. Most states require documentation, which is reasonable. Other states are lax. Homeschooling as a movement is growing, and that is a very good thing. According to NHERI, the higher quality of homeschooling is not affected at all by whether or not the parent is a certified teacher, or by any state regulations.
The Truth About Homeschooling and Socialization
Usually what is meant by socialization or the lack thereof is that if we isolate our kids from the public or private school culture, our kids won’t know how to survive in the ‘real’ world. But the homeschool world has a lot more similarities to the ‘real world’ than any institutional setting.
Why are homeschooled kids so annoying?
Dwija Borobia
The biggest concern among the concerned is socialization. In other words: homeschooled kids are annoying and weird, and you don't want your kids to be annoying and weird, do you? Well, why are homeschooled kids so annoying? Because no one tells them that the way God made them isn't cool enough.
You Say Sheltering As If It’s A Bad Thing….
laurie Bostwick
Merriam Webster dictionary defines shelter as “a position or the state of being covered and protected." Sheltering can be a form of socialization. And children that are raised protected and nurtured know how to be social.


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